Get help from Virtual Agent on Windows 10!

On July 13th, 2017 Microsoft has released Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 16241 for PC to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring! As with previous builds, this one too brings up a dozen of new stuff and fixes. However, to me Getting Help from Virtual Agent is an awesome attempt by Microsoft to facilitate the overall process of getting help when things aren’t working the way it should with your computer. Although, it’s still in a Preview Version, the Virtual Agent acts with “courtesy and professionalism” in providing help. More than that, it offers you the option to Talk to a Person.

Here’s the Virtual Agent’s response to my question about pinning an app to Taskbar:

If you opt for the option Talk to a Person then you should select the product and select the issue from the drop down lists. The Virtual Agent will offer you the Call me back, Schedule a call, Chat, or Ask the community. It’s up to you to click the preferred option.

So far, it seems like the Virtual Agent is trying to provide you with the best possible answer along the process of providing help. Cool!

After Cortana, with Virtual Agent on Windows 10 Microsoft is bringing its virtual assistant full circle (Engadget, 2014).

Dear readers, hope you’ll find this post informative.

peace and blessings,

Bekim

Bekim Dauti’s Blog | Bekim Dauti’s Vlog | e-Books @Amazon Kindle Store

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How to get Windows 10 Mobile version 1703 (Build 15063) before April 25th, 2017?

After the roll out of the first phase of Windows 10 version 1703 on April 11th, 2017, Microsoft has announced that the roll out of the Windows 10 Mobile version 1703 is scheduled to begin on April 25th, 2017. However, if you have a Windows Phone with Windows 10 Mobile version 1607 (Build 14393) and want to update it to Windows 10 version 1703 (Build 15063) before April 25th, 2017 here’s what you need to do:

  1. Select Windows Insider Program from Settings > Update & security
  2. On the Get Insider Preview builds tap the Get started button
  3. Proceed with the process of joining the Windows Insider Program
  4. Select Fast as a pace to get the new builds
  5. (after your phone restarts) Select Phone update from Settings > Update & security
  6. Tap Check for updates button
  7. Shortly you’ll notice that a new update is available

8. Depending on your Internet connection, sure it’ll take some time to download

9. Make sure that your phone’s battery is fully charged (or at least 40%) in order to install the update

10. After the installation is complete and the phone is restarted, select About from Settings > System to check that Windows 10 Mobile version 1703 is installed on your Windows Phone

Hope you’ll find this post informative.

peace and blessings,

Bekim

Bekim Dauti’s Blog | Bekim Dauti’s Vlog | e-Books @Amazon Kindle Store

Windows 10: Microsoft Edge

The following is a sample chapter from the e-Book Windows 10: Learning through practice. Enjoy reading!

“The faster, safer browser designed for Windows 10.” Microsoft

Windows 10 brought new browser to surf the web. Microsoft Edge provides new ways to find stuff, read and write on the web, and get help from Cortana right in the browser. (Microsoft)

Running Microsoft Edge app

To get running the Microsoft Edge in your Windows 10, complete the following steps:

  1. Select the Start button

2. Select the Microsoft Edge from the pined tile on the Start menu3. Select the Microsoft Edge from the Apps list on the Start menu

4. Search for Microsoft Edge from the Cortana’s search box on the taskbar

5. Shortly the Microsoft Edge browser opens up

Search from the address bar

To search from the Microsoft Edge address bar, complete the following steps:

  1. Select the Start button
  2. Select the Microsoft Edge from the pined tile on the Start menu
  3. Type the keyword on the address bar

All your stuff is in Hub

To view your favorites, reading list, browsing history, and current download in Microsoft Edge, complete the following steps:

  1. Select the Start button
  2. Select the Microsoft Edge from the pined tile on the Start menu
  3. Select the Hub on the menu bar on the right side of Microsoft Edge windows

Read without distraction

To read without or fewer distractions in Microsoft Edge, complete the following steps:

  1. Select the Start button
  2. Select the Microsoft Edge from the pined tile on the Start menu
  3. Select the Reading View on the menu bar on the right side of Microsoft Edge window

Save articles on Reading list

To save articles on a reading list in Microsoft Edge, complete the following steps:

  1. Select the Start button
  2. Select the Microsoft Edge from the pined tile on the Start menu
  3. Select the Star (on the right of Reading View icon) on the menu bar on the right side of Microsoft Edge window
  4. Select the Reading List tab
  5. Click Add button

Write on the web

To write and highlight on the webpages in Microsoft Edge, complete the following steps:

  1. Select the Start button
  2. Select the Microsoft Edge from the pined tile on the Start menu
  3. Select the Make a web note on the menu bar on the right side of Microsoft Edge window
  4. Select the Pen from the menu bar to write on the webpage
  5. Select the Highlighter from the menu bar to highlight on the webpage
  6. Select the Save Web Note from the menu bar to save the notes and highlights made by you on the webpage
  7. Select the Exit from the menu bar to exit the Make a web note feature

Hope you’ll find this post informative.

Windows 10: New WU Troubleshooter to Try

By Ed Tittel,

MS has included a built-in update troubleshooter for Windows 10 for some time now. But there’s a new WU troubleshooter to try, if that tool fails or falters. It’s available through an MS Support page entitled “Fix Windows Update errors.” There, you can download a file named latestwu.diagcab to a target PC. This software is device independent, so you could easily carry it on a USB flash drive for field use. I tried it on a handful of Windows 10 PCs and it worked just fine on all of them. Here’s what it looks like:

windows-update-troubleshooter

The name of the download, appropriately enough, is latestwu.diagcab

What’s Up with the New WU Troubleshooter?

I wish I could say definitively. Those already familiar with the built-in tool will immediately recognize that the new, downloadable version looks exactly like the older, built-in version. The release date for the new one appears on MS Web pages dated 12/15/2016. It’s identified as revision 37, with an ondisk file size of 161 KB. Thus, admins should run the new version manually rather than using the Control Panel Troubleshooting widget.

I’m guessing this situation is temporary. It should show up in some future Windows 10 update as a Control Panel/Troubleshooting item. However, this may not happen until the next major version of Windows 10 comes along in April 2017 though. Therefore, you might want keep this in your admin toolkit until then!

Note:

The article was originally published by Ed Tittel @ IT Knowledge Exchange on January 2nd, 2016. It is reproduced on this blog with an author’s permission.

Hope you’ll find this post informative.

Blog of the Week: Win10 Marketshare Flat in Q316

by Ed Tittel, on November 07th, 2016

The UK website, The Register, has thoughtfully consolidated Windows 10 marketshare numbers from my favorite sources. They report that Windows 10 growth appears as flat as a board for the just-ended calendar quarter. In looking for explanations for what makes Win10 marketshare flat in Q316, look no further than the end of the free upgrade on July 29.

Here’s a telling table of results from The Register’s 11/2 article entitled “Windows 10 market share stalls after free upgrade offer ends:”

win10-marketshare

The values do vary, but the trend is undeniably flat across all sources.
[Source: TheRegister, 11/2/16]

Who Says Win10 Marketshare Flat in Q316?

The Register turned to three of my very favorite sources for OS marketshare data in compiling this table, so I’m happy to grant some credence to the results they present:

NetMarketShare.com aggregates web traffic from ~40,000 affiliated websites, and counts ~160M unique visits per month. While they can’t truly represent the entire globe (mostly the more-networked parts, actually) they offer a useful approximation.

Analytics.usa.gov is more narrow and captures client/user agent info only from browsers that visit the US Government’s thousands of websites. It’s always a bit more leading-edge, because the USA is farthest down the Windows 10 adoption trail.

StatCounter is a web traffic analysis tool that offers both free and for-a-fee tracking services. Based in Dublin, the company claims to represent three percent of all global websites (that’s 33M websites, based on current Internet Live Stats values).

Though values do differ between NetMarketShare and StatCounter, they are in the same ballpark. More important they show only negligible growth month-over-month for the previous quarter. (Even a slight decline, according to NetMarketShare).

Apparently, Windows 10 has hit the wall. In the absence of the free promotion, it does indeed appear stalled. Whether this is a temporary lull while the market catches its breath or a major future vexation for MS, only time will tell.

[Note: here’s a shout out to VIP Member lehnerus2000 at TenForums.com, whose 11/5 post brought The Register’s story to my attention. Thanks!]

Note:

The article was originally written by Ed Tittel and published by IT Knowledge Exchange on November 07th, 2016. It is reproduced on this blog with an author’s permission.

Hope you’ll find this post informative.

peace and blessings,

Bekim

Bekim Dauti’s Blog | Bekim Dauti’s Vlog | e-Books @Amazon Kindle Store

Happy birthday: 20 Years of Windows Operating System

20-years-of-windows

Windows 95 (1995) – Windows 10 (2015)

Windows 95 (Codename: Chicago / Release date: August 24th, 1995)

“Windows 95 was a nice milestone.” Bill Gates

More than twenty years ago, it was August 24th, 1995 when Windows 95 (codenamed Chicago) was launched merging MS-DOS and earlier Windows OS’s into one single GUI (graphical user interface) operating system. The most important, the Windows 95 brought the Start menu which in the years to come would become the stamp of Windows operating systems. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 95 at the time it was released was as follows:

  • Processor: 386DX or higher processor
  • RAM: 4 MB
  • HDD: 50-55 MB
  • FDD: 3.5 inch high-density
  • Monitor: VGA or higher resolution
  • Other hardware: keyboard and mouse
  • Internet connection: Dial-up

figure30

Windows 98 (Codename: Memphis / Release date: June 25th, 1998)

Windows ’98 is so similar to Windows ’95 because Apple hasn’t invented anything worth copying since 1995.” Jakob Nielsen

In an attempt to improve Windows 95, Microsoft on June 25th, 1998 launched Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis), yet another DOS dependent operating system. Built on a platform of Windows 95, Windows 98 introduced several improvements among which most noticeable were the performance, Plug-and-Play, and networking improvements. Interesting enough, Windows 98 was characterized by its famous startup sound. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 98 were:

  • Processor: 486DX or higher processor
  • RAM: 16 MB
  • HDD: 175-225 MB
  • FDD: 3.5 inch high-density
  • Monitor: VGA or higher resolution
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard and mouse
  • Internet connection: Dial-up or broadband

figure61

Windows Millennium Edition (Codename: Millennium / Release date: September 14th, 2000)

The name Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me, will help Microsoft to clearly identify this next iteration of the OS as the Windows version designed specifically with the home user in mind.” Shawn Sanford

Windows Millennium Edition (codenamed Millennium), released on September 14th, 2000 was a successor to Windows 98 built upon Windows 9x series platform. However, it was an operating system which combined the Windows 9x series platform with the “look & feel” of Windows 2000 bringing up the restricted access to real mode MS-DOS by introducing the protected mode. With Windows ME, Microsoft introduced the Windows Movie Maker video editing application. Other than that, Windows ME contained a new version of Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player, and Windows Explorer. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows ME were:

  • Processor: 150 MHz or higher processor
  • RAM: 32 MB
  • HDD: 320 MB
  • FDD: 3.5 inch high-density
  • Monitor: VGA or higher resolution
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard and mouse
  • Internet connection: Dial-up or broadband

figure79

Windows 2000 (Codename: No codename / Release date: February 17th, 2000)

“…In short, Windows 2000 Professional may be the best desktop OS Microsoft ever shipped.” John Sheesley

With Windows 2000 (no codename), released on February 17th, 2000, Microsoft for the first time after Windows NT 4.0 introduced an operating system for use on both client and server computers. Known as Windows NT 5.0, Windows 2000 was offered in four editions: Professional, Sever, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server. From Plug and Play and hardware support improvements to System Utilities and Recovery Console, Windows 2000 introduced both new and updated features. Interesting, Windows 2000 was a multitasking and multiprocessing operating system as it supported 2 processors. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 2000 were:

  • Processor: 300 MHz or higher processor
  • RAM: 32 MB
  • HDD: 2 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Dial-up or broadband

figure106

Windows eXPerience (Codename: Whistler / Release date: October 25th, 2001)

If Microsoft introduces Windows XP as planned with the messaging applications and the media player bundled with it, it seems to me that companies like RealNetworks would have a basis for filing a suit.” Richard McKenzie

The Windows eXPerience or as it is known as Windows XP (codenamed Whistler) was released in October 25th, 2001. With Windows XP, Microsoft merged the Windows 9x’s series user interface and gaming performance with Windows 2000’s stability and security, thus unifying both consumer and business Windows into a single Windows NT platform operating system. That said, behind Windows XP was standing the Windows NT 5.1. Of course, apart from introducing many improved and updated features of both Windows 9x and Windows 2000, Windows XP introduced a revamped Start menu, a colorful user-interface, Windows Product Activation, fast user switching, and many other new features. On top of that, Windows XP marked the end of DOS era making it non-DOS dependent operating system. Same as Windows 2000, Windows XP was a multitasking, multithreading, and multiprocessing operating system supporting up to 2 processors, and both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows XP were:

  • Processor: 233 MHz or higher processor
  • RAM: 64 MB
  • HDD: 1.5 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Dial-up or broadband

figure157

Windows Vista (Codename: Longhorn / Release date: January 30th, 2007)

“A system that will run Windows Vista may not be capable of using all of its features.” Joe Wilcox

Windows Vista (codenamed Longhorn), released in January 30th, 2007, was supposed to set the standard for future Windows operating systems. However, its high system requirements and few other issues, forced Microsoft to think about replacing Windows Vista with Windows 7. Regardless, Windows Vista brought many new features into desktop operating systems which wanted or not set the standard for the next coming Windows operating systems. Some of Vista’s new features to note here were Aero graphical user interface (GUI), Windows Search, Windows Sidebar, User Account Control (UAC), advanced security, and many others. In addition, like its ancestors Windows 2000 & Windows XP, it continued to support up to 2 processors, and both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows Vista were:

  • Processor: 1 GHz both 32/64-bit or higher processor
  • RAM: 1 GB
  • Graphics card: 128 MB
  • HDD: 40 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Broadband

figure195

Windows 7 (Codename: Vienna / Release date: October 22nd, 2009)

“Windows 7 showed up in the market to “save” Microsoft after the company failed to market the feature-heavy Vista properly and the public soured on it.” John C. Dvorak

Windows 7 (codenamed Vienna), another Windows NT family operating system released in October 22nd, 2009, achieved overcoming the issues raised by Windows Vista. Other than that, Windows 7 managed to become the most widely used version of Windows operating systems. From the technology perspective, it can be said that Windows 7 introduced new features, however the list of improved features was simply huge which when compared to Windows Vista, it almost took less hardware resources to run it. In the same format with previous Windows NT family operating systems, Windows 7 provided support for up to 2 physical processors, and both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 7 were:

  • Processor: 1 GHz both 32/64-bit or higher processor
  • RAM: 1 GB
  • Graphics card: 128 MB or more
  • HDD: 20 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Broadband

figure227

Windows 8 (Codename: No codename / Release date: October 26th, 2012)

“I think nothing frustrated people more about Windows 8 than the lack of a traditional start menu.” Leo Notenboom

Windows 8, released in October 26th, 2012, set the new standard for Microsoft’s Windows operating systems for touch-based devices. It’s an operating system which said goodbye to Start button and menu, in order to replace it with the Start screen. Since Microsoft’s effort was to make revolution with Windows 8 and not just an evolution, many new features were introduced. The most notably were Metro user-interface and the Windows store. Like its Windows NT family operating systems predecessors, Windows 8 provided support for up to 2 physical processors, both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, and Advanced RISC Machines (ARM) architecture. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 8 on laptops and desktops were:

  • Processor: 1 GHz both 32/64-bit or higher processor
  • RAM: 1 GB
  • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 with WDDM driver
  • HDD: 20 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA, and multi-touch display screen
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Broadband

figure260

Windows 8.1 (Codename: Blue / Release date: October 17th, 2013)

“A year after Windows 8’s debut, Windows 8.1 is here. Is it better than its predecessor? Yes, but in small ways.” Jeff Bertolucci

Either call it an upgrade or a new operating system, Windows 8.1 (codenamed Blue) was released in October 17th, 2013, as an answer to all the complaints addressed to Microsoft regarding Windows 8 issues. Thus, that’s the reason why Microsoft is calling Windows 8.1 an update rather than upgrade from Windows 8! Windows 8.1 is available for free for any PC with Windows 8 and can be obtained through Windows store. Interesting, Windows 8.1 brought back the Start button but not the Start menu. Windows 8.1, another Windows NT family operating system, offers a lot of improved features. Similarly, Windows 8.1 provides support for up to 2 physical processors, both 32/64-bit, and ARM architecture. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 8.1 on laptops and desktops are the same as they were with Windows 8:

  • Processor: 1 GHz both 32/64-bit or higher processor
  • RAM: 1 GB
  • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 with WDDM driver
  • HDD: 20 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA, and multi-touch display screen
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Broadband

figure310

Windows 10 (Codename: Threshold / Release date: July 29th, 2015)

“It wouldn’t be right to call it Windows 9.” Terry Myerson

Windows 10 (codenamed Threshold), released in July 29th, 2015, combined Windows 7 and Windows 8/8.1 into one single operating system. Windows 10 is the last operating system released for personal computers. That said, Windows 10 new releases will be offered through Windows as a service format. Similarly, for the 1st anniversary planned for July 2016, Microsoft will release Windows 10 (codenamed Redstone) introducing a number of new features and enhancements. Interesting, Microsoft has offered a brand new operating system for free. With that in mind, the free offer for upgrading from Windows 7/8/8.1 to Windows 10 was available until July 29th, 2016. This year, Microsoft has released an update to Windows 10 version 1607 (Codename: Redstone / Release date: August 2nd, 2016). Windows 10 is another Windows NT family operating system that provides support for 2 physical processors 32/64-bit, and ARM architecture. The minimum system requirements for installing Windows 10 are:

  • Processor: 1 GHz both 32/64-bit or higher processor
  • RAM: 1 GB
  • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 with WDDM driver
  • HDD: 20 GB
  • Monitor: SVGA, and multi-touch display screen
  • Other hardware: network adapter, CD-ROM or DVD-ROM, sound card and speakers, keyboard, mouse, and other pointing device
  • Internet connection: Broadband and Microsoft account

figure358

Whom this e-Book is for?

This e-Book is an excellent collection of Windows operating systems installation. From Windows 95 to Windows 10. With that in mind, this e-Book is designed to get you started with the process of installing any Windows operating systems. Thus, this e-Book is for everyone! For the beginners, who are making the first steps in Windows 10 operating system, for advanced users who besides Windows 10 they have experience with Windows XP and the latest Windows operating systems, and for all those computer geeks who have been in a close friendship with the Windows operating system from the version 1.0 and onwards. That said, while the beginners and to some extent the advanced users can use this e-Book to become familiar with the Windows 95/98/ME installation, on the other hand to computer geeks this e-Book can serve as a “photo album” to bring back “good old memories” about how Windows Setup has evolved. Other than that, this e-Book proves to be a handy informational source for everyone who is involved in studying operating systems in general, and Windows operating systems in particular. However, this e-Book is not intended to provide the in-depth explanations of each and every Windows operating system other than installation itself. Instead, with step-by-step instructions driven by targeted, easy-to-understand graphics, this e-Book explains and shows you how to install the Windows operating systems from Windows 95 to Windows 10. With the guidance provided by this easy to follow resource, you will quickly learn the tools and the steps it takes to install any of the aforementioned versions of Windows operating system.

20 YW

20 Years of Windows: From Windows 95 to Windows 10: (How to install Windows?)

Product Details:

  • File Size: 6590 KB
  • Print Length: 307 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Bekim Dauti; 1 edition (June 15, 2016)
  • Publication Date: June 15, 2016
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English

Table of Contents:

Introduction
Chapter 1: How to install Windows 95?
Chapter 2: How to install Windows 98 SE?
Chapter 3: How to install Windows ME?
Chapter 4: How to install Windows 2000 Professional?
Chapter 5: How to install Windows XP Professional?
Chapter 6: How to install Windows Vista Business?
Chapter 7: How to install Windows 7 Professional?
Chapter 8: How to install Windows 8 Pro?
Chapter 9: How to install Windows 8.1 Pro?
Chapter 10: How to install Windows 10 Pro?
Appendix A: Preparing computer for the Windows 95/98/ME installation
Appendix B: Downloading Windows 10 Enterprise

Thank You!

Thank you for your time and consideration to purchase, download and read my e-Book! If you’ve liked this e-Book and want to participate actively in the further improvement process, then please e-Mail your:

  • comments
  • suggestions, and
  • observations

at BekimDauti@BekimDauti.com. I will read them with pleasure and will try to include your comments, suggestions, and observation in the next editions of this e-Book.

Hope you’ll find this post informative.

peace and blessings,

Bekim

Bekim Dauti’s Blog | Bekim Dauti’s Vlog | e-Books @Amazon Kindle Store

 

 

Blog of the Week: Windows Self-Healing Tool in Test

by Ed Tittel, on August 19th, 2016

Thanks to an intrepid poster to the Microsoft Community forums, a link to an experimental Windows Self-Healing Tool is now available. Apparently, MS Support offers this tool to individuals who’ve experienced widely-reported freezing issues that follow in the wake of applying the recent Anniversary Update to Windows 10. But the tool is described as still in test, and “not yet released as part of the new System Update.” I’ve downloaded it and tried it out myself. But because none of my systems is subject to post-AU freezes, I can’t say if or how well it works to fix them. I can say, however, that the tool does no harm to healthy test systems. That said, it does require some minor clean-ups to restore them to fully normal operation.

Windows 10 Self-healing Tool

The tool is named WindowsSelfHealingTool.exe, and runs from File Explorer.

The Windows Self-Healing Tool in Action

From looking at how the tool describes itself and behaves during execution, I’ll make some educated guesses about what it does to address freezing issues with Windows 10. First, a look at the outputs from progress tracking screens recites its actions:

Repair system components and detect corrupt files:
Resync System Date and Time
Reset System Settings
Reinstall System Applications

Repair system corruption
Restore Component Store Health
Restore System Health
Repair System Corruption
System Restart

Update system
Windows Update
Final Reboot

Tool Completion

From what I see, the tool combines Windows system maintenance commands and activities to restore system health and function. In section one, it resets system date and time to make sure update and other system services work properly. It also appears to reset Windows 10 to default settings and to replace key applications such as File Explorer. In section two, it probably makes use of DISM and the System File Checker. The former serves to repair the WinSxS component store and the latter to detect and replace corrupt or damaged system files. In section three, it appears to attempt Windows Update repair (stop then restart key services, check update capability). Then it applies any outstanding updates. The final reboot returns control of the system to the user.

All in all, the tool works through a standard but helpful sequence of system checks and repairs. Thus, if the Windows Self-Healing Tool makes it into production, it could become a useful item in any admin’s toolbox for Windows.

Note:

The article was originally written by Ed Tittel and published by IT Knowledge Exchange on August 19th, 2016. It is reproduced on this blog with an author’s permission.

Dear readers, hope you’ll find this post informative.

peace and blessings,

Bekim

Bekim Dauti’s Blog | Bekim Dauti’s Vlog | e-Books @Amazon Kindle Store